Jun 20, 2013
phoebebishopwright:


Giulia Bianchi

phoebebishopwright:

Giulia Bianchi

(Source: cactuslands)

Jun 5, 2013
phoebebishopwright:

Gillian Wearing

phoebebishopwright:

Gillian Wearing

Jun 5, 2013
phoebebishopwright:


Prada Marfa is a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset, situated 2.3 km (1.4 mi) northwest of Valentine, Texas, just off U.S. Route 90, and about 60 km (37 mi) northwest of the city of Marfa. The installation was inaugurated on October 1, 2005. The artists called the work a “pop architectural land art project.” The sculpture, realized with the assistance of American architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello,[4] cost US $80,000 and was intended to never be repaired, so it might slowly degrade back into the natural landscape.

Had a lecture from Danny Rolph today and he mentioned this, apparently it is full of cobwebs. Despite the CSM graduate fashion shows being pretty amazing (hello Matty Bovan) this shows my overriding feelings towards fashion. (I agree with Oscar Wilde- a form of ugliness so intolerable it has to be altered every six months, ugly in the sense of the industry more than anything)

phoebebishopwright:

Prada Marfa is a permanently installed sculpture by artists Elmgreen and Dragset, situated 2.3 km (1.4 mi) northwest of Valentine, Texas, just off U.S. Route 90, and about 60 km (37 mi) northwest of the city of Marfa. The installation was inaugurated on October 1, 2005. The artists called the work a “pop architectural land art project.” The sculpture, realized with the assistance of American architects Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello,[4] cost US $80,000 and was intended to never be repaired, so it might slowly degrade back into the natural landscape.

Had a lecture from Danny Rolph today and he mentioned this, apparently it is full of cobwebs. Despite the CSM graduate fashion shows being pretty amazing (hello Matty Bovan) this shows my overriding feelings towards fashion. (I agree with Oscar Wilde- a form of ugliness so intolerable it has to be altered every six months, ugly in the sense of the industry more than anything)

May 18, 2013
Barbara Hepworth drawing

Barbara Hepworth drawing

May 18, 2013
Henry Moore in his studio

Henry Moore in his studio

May 18, 2013

Extracts from Barbara Hepworth: Drawings from a Sculptor’s Landscape, London, 1966

"The wonderful structure of the human frame is an architecture of highest proportion, and all sensitivity to landscape is in one’s ability to feel within one’s body: to feel with a primitive humility a response to life and location, a response to form, texture and rhythm, and a response to the magic of light, both sun and moon everchanging."

"I rarely draw what I see – I draw what I feel in my body. Sculpture is a three-dimensional projection of primitive feeling: touch, texture, size and scale, hardness and warmth, evocation and compulsion to move, live, and love. Landscape is strong – it has bones and flesh and skin and hair. It has age and history and a principle behind its evolution."

"Whenever I am embraced by land and seascape I draw ideas for new sculptures: new forms to touch and walk round, new people to embrace, with an exactitude of form that those without sight can hold and realize. For me it is the same as the touch of a child in health, not in sickness. The feel of a loved person who is strong and fierce and not tired and bowed down. This is not an aesthetic doctrine, nor is it a mystical idea. It is essentially practical and passionate, and it is my whole life, as expressed in stone, marble, wood and bronze."

"A sculptor’s landscape embraces all things that grow and live and are articulate in principle: the shape of the buds already formed in autumn, the thrust and fury of spring growth, the adjustment of trees and rocks and human beings to the fierceness of winter - all these belong to the sculptor’s world, as well as the supreme perception of man, woman and child of this expanding universe. It is within our bodies to feel and to be, and in making a sculpture we do, in fact, make a talisman that enables us to enter our architecture and look at our painting as fully posed human beings."

"When I start drawing and painting abstract forms I am really exploring new forms, hollows, and tensions which will lead me where I need to go. Planes and curves are the pure rhythm of stance and energy. The pierced hole allows bodily entry and re-entry. The spiral takes hold of one’s hand and arm. A fulness can be a breast, or a head or a shoulder. A hollow can be the taut hollow in the thigh. Strings can twist one from the front to the back, and colour establish the mood of place and time. Out of all these components I search for new associations of form and hollow and space, and a new tautness and awareness for the growth of new sculptures."

"Sculpture is, in the twentieth century, a wide field of experience, with many facets of symbol and material and individual calligraphy. But in all these varied and exciting extensions of our experience we always come back to the fact that we are human beings of such and such a size, biologically the same as primitive man, and that it is through drawing and observing, or observing and drawing, that we equate our bodies with our landscape. A sculptor’s landscape is one of ever-changing space and light where forms reveal themselves in new aspects as the sun rises and sets, and the moon comes up. It is a primitive world; but a world of infinite subtle meaning."

May 18, 2013
Barbara Hepworth’s studio, St Ives

Barbara Hepworth’s studio, St Ives

May 7, 2013

Coggles street style selection (2)

May 6, 2013

Paul Smith AW13 Menswear - backstage

May 6, 2013
Matisse

Matisse

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